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Dieren en planten

Raptors   Buzzard   Goshawk   Harriers   Falcons   Raptors and owls   

Goshawk

size:

48-61 centimeters
wingspan: 98-117 centimeters

color adults:

barred grey body, white line above the eye, black crown, dark feathers by ear. male: blue-grey back; female: grey back

food:

birds (up to the size of mallard duck), mammals

Dutch status:

nesting bird; seen year round

habitat:

forest and open woodlands

reproduction:

3-4 eggs

life span:

7 years (maximum known age: +18.5 years)

special nature:

generally silent bird, except during mating season

  • Dut: Havik
  • Eng: Goshawk
  • Fre: Autour des palombes
  • Ger: Habicht
  • Ital: Astore
  • Lat: Accipiter gentilis
Havik, Foto Fitis, www.fotofitis.nl

Goshawk

Goshawks are reckless rapid fliers. When hunting other birds in a dense forest, they 'take a running start' by flapping their wings several times and then rapidly flying after their chosen prey with their wings held very close to their bodies. In that way, they avoid hitting obstacles. If necessary, they will dive straight through bushes.

On Texel


In 2011, 14 pairs of goshawks made nests on Texel. The first nesting pair on the island occurred in 1997.

  • Crazy for differences

    Goshawks like to eat pigeons but it isn't easy to choose a victim flying in a large cloud of identical pigeons. Studies have shown that goshawks prefer to grab a pigeon with a variation. For instance, a black pigeon in a white group or a white pigeon in a black group. It is probably easier to keep track of the notable difference during an attack. Scientists†noted that older hawks in particular showed this manner of hunting. Young hawks probably still need to learn the trick.

  • Distribution and habitat

    Goshawks are found in the entire northern hemisphere. They generally make their nests in forests, but hunt in fields and meadows. Since recently, they are also found in cities, particularly city parks. Goshawks do well in the Netherlands. There are many more than 30 years ago, when the population dropped severely due particularly to chemical pesticides used in farming.

  • Crazy for differences

    Goshawks like to eat pigeons but it isn't easy to choose a victim flying in a large cloud of identical pigeons. Studies have shown that goshawks prefer to grab a pigeon with a variation. For instance, a black pigeon in a white group or a white pigeon in a black group. It is probably easier to keep track of the notable difference during an attack. Scientists†noted that older hawks in particular showed this manner of hunting. Young hawks probably still need to learn the trick.

  • Protection
    • Monitoring: Network Ecological Monitoring
    • Policy: Target Species List
    • National legislation: Flora and Fauna Regulation
    • European Agreement: CITES ordinance
    • International: Bern Convention, Bonn Convention